Geothermals Top 10 Takeaways


If your knowledge of geothermal heating and cooling is next to nil, you ought to know this, at least – especially if you’re planning on upgrading your current Denver home’s HVAC system or at a loss for how best to heat and cool the new home you’re having constructed:
  1. Geothermal HVAC systems are some of the most environmentally friendly on the market. Their simple technology channels subterranean temperatures to provide your Denver home with winter heat and summer cooling. Thus, your home and the earth are always in sync, bonded together in a unique – and uniquely compatible – home-earth symbiosis. Sound a little too highfalutin? All it means is that, with geothermal heating and cooling, your home isn’t upending the natural order of things. Instead, it’s becoming a “nicer” part of the environment.
  2. Geothermal HVAC systems qualify as “renewable energy technology.” True, they run off of electricity. But they don’t require much of it for all the value you get. Just one unit of electricity can transfer up to five units of natural heating or cooling from the earth to your home.
  3. Geothermal HVAC systems are much more efficient than solar (photovoltaic) or wind power systems. In truth, solar and wind technologies, whatever the draw of their “renewability,” devour four times more kilowatt-hours of electricity per dollar spent than geothermal systems.
  4. Geothermal HVAC systems will be hardly noticeable on your property. Don’t have much yard space anyway? No eye-opener there: most home lots in Denver and elsewhere anymore occupy a comparatively restricted the polyethylene piping used for the geothermal earth loops doesn’t have to be buried horizontally. It can be dug in vertically and extended to a depth of anywhere from 100 to 400 feet. Almost no above-ground surface is necessary in any case, whether vertical, horizontal, open (well water), or pond loops are installed. Result? You can keep your little patch of paradise a whole lot greener.
  5. Geothermal HVAC systems are unbelievably quiet. Every aspect of a geothermal system is designed and engineered to run significantly quieter than conventional gas furnaces, heat pumps, or air conditioners. Even better, there’s no outside unit, so you and your neighbors are spared the irritation of fans, belts, and compressors whirring, whining, and rattling away at all hours!
  6. Geothermal HVAC systems are long-term heating and cooling solutions, built to last for generations. Modern geothermal technology, manufacturing guidelines, and installation procedures ensure ground loops of extraordinary longevity and heat-exchange equipment that will keep working perfectly for decades. It helps, of course, that the heat-exchange equipment is sheltered indoors. At least, when it does by and by need repairing or replacing, it’s not likely that you’ll be redoing the ground, well, or pond loops along with it. So replacement costs can be relatively low.
  7. Geothermal HVAC systems don’t demand much maintenance at all. The earth loops, as previously described, are designed to endure for generations, and when appropriately buried, will do so without any need for intervention. Fans, compressors, and pumps, kept safe indoors from weather extremes, need only sporadic scrutiny as well as periodic filter changes and a coil cleaning once a year.
  8. Geothermal HVAC systems are as effective in cooling as they are in heating. The old perception that geothermal HVAC systems don’t cool as well as they heat has been substantially invalidated by ongoing enhancements in the manufacture of geothermal technology.
  9. Geothermal HVAC systems can be set up to multitask. Very well, so you’ve decided on heating your home’s water geothermally. But can a geothermal system provide ambient heat for your home too? And what if you have a swimming pool? Relax. Today’s systems can do it all and do it simultaneously, with no favoring of one task over another.
  10. Geothermal HVAC systems are becoming increasingly affordable – even without federal and local tax incentives. Congress has yet to reinstate federal tax credits for geothermal heating and cooling that ended December 31, 2016. That said, a number of factors – material and technological advances, new installation practices, and greater competition in the marketplace, for the most part – are helping to better correlate geothermal solutions with the cost of traditional heating and cooling methods.
 
Talk with the geothermal professionals at Sensible Heating & Cooling today. They’ll clearly outline the rewards of geothermal heating and cooling so you can make the best decision for your Denver home.